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February 05, 2007

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Comments

robert d.

I used to really like Gary Sinise. I never got into the CSI things so much.  Did you ever see him in the recent remake of "Of Mice and Men?" I used to be a pretty big Law and Order fan, but there is just too much of it these days, although I think that Marissa Hagerty is really hot. I tried to watch that NCIS show once, and found it totally inane in an A-Team kind of way, but at least the A-team was making fun of themselves. It's so rare to find any complexity to any characters on TV these days, and for that matter, in movies. Maybe that's why FX was hitting a nerve with shows like the Shield and Rescue Me. The protagonists are deeply flawed instead in otherwise heroic roles. We forgive them because their results are for the most part good, although their means are questionable. NYPD Blue had a big dose of that too.

As I recall from hazy memories of a film history class (that I attended for the most part stoned) the movement toward flawed protagonists was pioneered in the western characters like Shane and John Wayne in "The Searchers". By '67 audiences were comfortable with the criminal elements of Bonnie and Clyde because they still had fairly wholesome values (remember the scene where CJ admonished Bonnie for smoking too much?). We rooted for Butch and Sundance for because their core value was loyalty to each other. Alas, the movement has devolved to the point where characters don't have to have any socially redeeming qualities as long as they are good looking (Pulp Fiction).

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